viola riviniana purpurea

The ... read more, You said there would be turkey. It is a perennial herb of woodland edges, grassland and shady hedge banks. Appreciates a rich, moist soil. Also a nice choice also for tubs or mixed containers, especially with other purple-leaved plants such as Coral Bells. Viola labradorica. Bears small blue/violet coloured flowers with a purple spur in March to May and often July through to September. I find that the flowers are small and stingily produced, and their season is brief. One member has or wants this plant for trade. Viola riviana is grown as a flowering groundcover in gardens and as a house plant. Viola riviniana, the common dog-violet, is a species of the genus Viola native to Eurasia and Africa. Family Violaceae Genus Viola can be annuals, biennials or deciduous or evergreen perennials, with simple or pinnately lobed leaves and 5-petalled flowers of characteristic shape Details V. riviniana is a mat-forming rhizomatous perennial with ovate, heart-shaped leaves and violet flowers with a pale spur, in late spring and early summer Greater light and cooler temperatures bring out the purple tones, and the leaves are greener in more shade and heat. My plants are substantially smaller than the several common weedy native species---the height is generally 1-4". It is also called wood violet and dog violet. The popular purple-leafed violet that's widely sold in the US as the native Labrador violet (Viola labradorica) is actually a form of the European dog violet, Viola riviniana Purpurea Group, also called V. riviniana var. I find that individual plants are short-lived, and if I want to keep it I need to rely on its prolific self-sowing. Viola riviniana Purpurea Group is a European species widely sold in the US under the misleading name of Viola labradorica. Seeding around freely, it makes a running mass of small dark purple leaves which set off the quantities of small, light violet coloured alas scentless flowers. Self seeds everywhere and may even become invasive over time but great for a wood/wild flower garden. The true Viola labradorica, native to North America, does not … (Now correctly Viola riviniana Purpurea Group) A charming violet for the rock garden or as a pathway edging in shady places. Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater, Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone, By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets), From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse, Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds, Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored. Viola labradorica var. Much more an eye catcher than most Violas. Forms a low tuft of purple-tinged leaves, with small mauve-purple violets in spring and fall. It's a good plant for the "wild" looking garden under trees, if you don't mind that it isn't native. It tends to grow where it wants to, and it doesn't pay a lot of attention to my ideas about where I want it to grow---it often tends to fade out there, for reasons I can't seem to discern. (Now correctly Viola riviniana Purpurea Group) A charming violet for the rock garden or as a pathway edging in shady places. Viola riviniana Purpurea Group (Common dog violet Purpurea Group) will reach a height of 0.2m and a spread of 0.4m after 2-5 years. … This led to finding the true ID here. I use ... read more, Our neighbors had peacocks when I was growing up. A purple-leaved form of the European dog-violet (Viola riviniana 'Purpurea Group'), is often sold by nurseries as Viola labradorica. Purpurea of Gardens often still sold as this. That means I can't use a weed-suppressive mulch. The true Viola labradorica is almost never sold. Almost hairless perennial with small, heart shaped, burgandy coloured leaves. The burgundy leaves set off the blooms perfectly. On May 8, 2010, henryr10 from Cincinnati, OH (Zone 6b) wrote: Thanks Baa! The true Viola labradorica, native to North America, does not appear to be currently in cultivation. May continue blooming all summer in cool-summer regions. May continue blooming all summer in cool-summer regions. It is found in all soils except acid or very wet. All we see are empty ... read more, Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of the Davesgarden.com. I had been seeing this plant growing along the road ... read more, I have literal swarms of honey bees yearly. Forms a low tuft of purple-tinged leaves, with small mauve-purple violets in spring and fall. purpurea, according to the American Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Perennials, Graham Rice, ed.

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